Second Take: 2012 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 R-Spec. Хендай xj 250


HONDA HR-V İkinci El Arazi, SUV, Pick-up Fiyatlar Listeleri

Honda HR-V 4WDtemiz aile arabası jeep az yakar çok kaçar
2005 155.000 km Gri (Gümüş) 42.750 TL 07 Mart 2018İzmirGaziemir

 

Honda HR-V 4WDOTOMATİK VİTES 2005 HONDA HRV 1.6 16V 105HP 4K ORJİNAL
2005 198.000 km Gri (Gümüş) 45.000 TL 07 Mart 2018BursaOsmangazi

 

Honda HR-V 4WDNEVZATOTO-HONDA HR-V-4x4-L.P.G Lİ-ORJİNAL MASRAFSIZ BAKIMLI
2000 305.000 km Gri (Gümüş) 32.750 TL 06 Mart 2018İstanbulBahçelievler

 

Honda HR-V 4WDHonda Hr-V ACİL SATILIK
2004 207.000 km Siyah 32.500 TL 06 Mart 2018ErzurumYakutiye

 

Honda HR-V 4WDAcil Satılık
2004 207.000 km Siyah 32.500 TL 06 Mart 2018ErzurumYakutiye

 

Honda HR-V 2WD2005 GERÇEK OTOMATİK ÇOK TEMİZ
2005 186.000 km Gri (titanyum) 41.500 TL 05 Mart 2018İzmirBuca

 

Honda HR-V 4WDKARAMANLI KAĞAN DAN HONDA HR-V BAKIMLI AİLE ARABASI FULL+FULL 35750
2003 208.000 km Siyah 35.750 TL 05 Mart 2018AntalyaKonyaaltı

 

Honda HR-V 4WDSahibinden Honda HR-V 4WD 2006 Model
  • İlk Sahibi
2006 156.000 km Gri (Gümüş) 43.500 TL 03 Mart 2018HatayKırıkhan

 

Honda HR-V 4WDMemurdan bakimli ve temiz HRV 4+4 ü sorunsuzzz
2004 165.000 km Gri 47.500 TL 03 Mart 2018MersinTarsus

 

Honda HR-V 4WDHonda HRV TEMİZZDİR!!!
2000 144.000 km Gri 36.000 TL 03 Mart 2018OrduAltınordu

 

Honda HR-V 4WDJAPON HARİKASI
2006 156.000 km Gri 43.500 TL 02 Mart 2018HatayKırıkhan

 

Honda HR-V 4WD2005 ORJİNAL BAKIMLI 4x4 TEMİZ AİLE ARACI
2005 220.000 km Siyah 39.000 TL 02 Mart 2018AdanaYüreğir

 

Honda HR-V 4WDÇok nadir böyle temizi
2004 146.000 km Mavi 47.500 TL 28 Şubat 2018MersinTarsus

 

Honda HR-V 1.5 i-VTEC ExecutiveÖMER AUTO DAN 2017 HR-V 1.5 i-VTECH EXECUTIVE ''19.686''KM
  • Yeni Gibi
2017 19.686 km Gri 122.500 TL 27 Şubat 2018MuğlaUla

 

Honda HR-V 4WD2006 1.6 i 262.000 km 4x4 H-RV OTOMATİK
2006 262.000 km Siyah 39.750 TL 27 Şubat 2018İstanbulEsenyurt

 

Honda HR-V 4WDHONDA HR-V 4WD ,OTOMATİK LPGLİ
2000 207.000 km Gri (metalik) 37.500 TL 27 Şubat 2018BursaOsmangazi

 

Honda HR-V 4WD2 SAHİBİ ÖĞRETMENDEN BOYASIZ, DEĞİŞENSİZ [TÜP+LASTİK YENİ]
2004 209.000 km Siyah 44.000 TL 26 Şubat 2018AmasyaMerkez

 

Honda HR-V 4WD2004 HATASIZ 4X4 HR-V SIFIR ŞANZIMAN EMSALSİZ TEMİZLİKDE
2004 245.000 km Siyah 37.500 TL 26 Şubat 2018AnkaraAkyurt

 

Honda HR-V 4WDHONDA 1.6 MOTOR OTOMATİK LPG'Lİ HATASIZ HR-V JEEP HATASIZ
2002 183.258 km Şampanya 41.750 TL 26 Şubat 2018ManisaSoma

 

Honda HR-V 4WDGüvencesiyle Satılık Honda HR-V 1.6
2005 150.000 km Siyah 45.750 TL 25 Şubat 2018AntalyaAksu

 

www.arabam.com

2012 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 R-Spec Second Take

Free Price Quote From a Local Dealer

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

Change Car

Select Make Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Ferrari FIAT Ford Genesis GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Jaguar Jeep Karma Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln Lotus Maserati Mazda McLaren Mercedes-Benz MINI Mitsubishi Nissan Porsche Ram Rolls-Royce smart Subaru Tesla Toyota Volkswagen Volvo Select Model Accent Azera Elantra Elantra Coupe Elantra Touring Entourage Equus Genesis Genesis Coupe Ioniq Kona Santa Fe Santa Fe Sport Scoupe Sonata Sonata Hybrid Sonata Plug-in Tiburon Tucson Veloster Veracruz XG300 XG350 GO

Back in 2009, Hyundai made a big splash with the launch of its all-new Genesis, a near-luxury, rear-drive sedan the Korean automaker hoped would raise its profile as a player in the upscale automotive marketplace. At its launch, the Genesis sedan was available with a 290-horsepower 3.8-liter V-6 and a 385-horsepower 4.6-liter V-8.

But while it has been relatively well-received, Hyundai kicked things up a bit this year with the debut of the performance-tuned 2012 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 R-Spec, featuring Hyundai’s new 5.0-liter GDI (gasoline direct-injected) V-8 that pumps out 429 horsepower and 376 lb-ft of torque through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It has larger brakes (up from 13.0 inches to 13.6 front and rear) clamped by four-piston calipers all the way around. The suspension has been retuned with 25- to 30-percent stiffer Sachs Amplitude Selective Damping shock absorbers; the rear multilink is tauter; and the anti-roll bars each are 1 millimeter larger — now 26mm and 19mm front and rear, respectively.

In our July testing, the 4199-pound car hit 60 mph in 4.8 seconds (on par with a BMW 550i), and finished the quarter mile in 13.3 seconds at 107.1 mph (0.4 seconds quicker and 5.1 mph faster than a Ford Mustang V-6). It bested the four-door Genesis 4.6’s figure-eight time by nearly a second (26.3 seconds at 0.68 g) and stopped 3 feet shorter from 60 mph at 109 feet. It was also 0.01 g better around the skidpad than the 4.6-equipped car at 0.87 g. It’s apparent that the larger, more powerful engine and enhanced suspension tuning was just what the doctor ordered for the large rear-drive sedan.

Even though performance was much improved over lesser Genesis sedans (the excessive body lean noted on the 4.6 was nearly eliminated), we determined that the North American R-Spec nomenclature was a stretch — calling it Genesis “Sport” or “SE” would have been more befitting of its abilities.

The Genesis 5.0 R-Spec offers much-improved performance over its lesser counterparts, but does it live up to its $47,385 price tag as a luxury sedan? I spent a week in the R-Spec to find out.

The Genesis sedan pleases with such conveniences as keyless entry and push-button start. As I approached the car for the first time in our dimly lit parking garage with the key fob still in my pocket, the Genesis welcomed me by turning on the side mirror flood lamps. When you hit the engine start button, the driver’s seat moves into position. The engine fires up and idles smoothly, and the exhaust note is quiet.

The interior is expansive. Front seats are wide and minimally bolstered, but comfortable, and the lumbar support puts the seats in the Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport to shame. Heated front seats are welcome on 40-degree mornings and the cooled driver seat is a godsend when temps reach into the 80s. This 5-foot, 10-inch editor had no problem sitting in the back seat with the front seat all the way back — rear legroom is only 0.3 inch shy of the base BMW 7 Series. Rear seat headroom with the moonroof is tight, but slouching a little (taking advantage of the ample legroom) eliminates the issue.

The dash layout is simple and uncluttered. Overall, the infotainment system and climate control functions are intuitive and logical, with no need to open the owner’s manual. Occasionally, the navigation would not let me suspend or cancel route guidance; other times it would.

The R-Spec rides smooth, making my 20-mile commute down the highway bearable. Shifts, whether in stop-and-go freeway traffic or while running errands on the surface streets, are imperceptible. The R-Spec’s torque had no problem making the rear 235/45/19 tires scream “uncle” during assertive stoplight departures, but it was quickly squashed by the car’s electronic stability control. Disabling the ESC rewards with an extended rear wheel chirp off the line.

The R-Spec does very well at actual freeway speeds. Going with the 75 mph traffic flow, the 5.0-liter engine is quiet and subdued. Punch the accelerator to overtake slower moving traffic and by the time the transmission downshifts from eighth into fourth gear, the speedometer needle is sweeping into well above posted limits. The R-Spec lacks the high-speed handling feel that its name indicates, but not once was it difficult to keep the car on its intended course.

Other than an occasionally finicky navigation system, I have only a few quibbles with the Genesis sedan. The interior is attractive and the leather used on the seats is supple, but the same cannot be said of the leather surrounding the steering wheel and shift knob. It feels cold and hard, almost like plastic. Lastly, a more substantial dial for the infotainment system would be welcome. Overall, the Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec gives a sense of quality and luxury. If Hyundai addresses these minor interior concerns and continues tuning the suspension (maybe with a driver-selectable setup), the Genesis sedan will truly feel like it belongs in the class to which it aspires.

2012 Hyundai Genesis Sedan 5.0 R-Spec
BASE PRICE $47,385
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, RWD, 5-pass, 4-door, sedan
ENGINE 5.0L/429-hp/376-lb-ft DOHC 32-valve V-8
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT 4199 lb (54/46%)
WHEELBASE 115.6 in
LENGTH X WIDTH X HEIGHT 196.3 x 74.4 x 58.3 in
0-60 MPH 4.8 sec
EPA CITY/HWY FUEL ECON 16/25 mpg
ENERGY CONSUMPTION, CITY/HWY 211/135 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS 1.02 lb/mile
ON SALE IN U.S. Currently

www.motortrend.com

2012 Hyundai Azera First Look

Free Price Quote From a Local Dealer

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

Change Car

Select Make Acura Alfa Romeo AM General AMC American Motors Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CODA Daewoo Datsun De Tomaso Dodge Eagle Factory Five Racing Ferrari FIAT Fisker Ford Genesis Geo GMC Honda Hummer Hyundai Infiniti International Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Karma Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln Lotus Mack Maserati Maybach Mazda McLaren Mercedes-Benz Mercury MINI Mitsubishi Morris Nissan Oldsmobile Plymouth Pontiac Porsche Ram Rolls-Royce Saab Saleen Saturn Scion smart SRT Studebaker Subaru Suzuki Tesla Toyota Vincent Volkswagen Volvo Willys Select Model Accent Azera Elantra Elantra Coupe Elantra Touring Entourage Equus Genesis Genesis Coupe Ioniq Kona Santa Fe Santa Fe Sport Scoupe Sonata Sonata Hybrid Sonata Plug-in Tiburon Tucson Veloster Veracruz XG300 XG350 GO

Hyundai‘s biggest seller in its home market — the Grandeur sedan — moves 10,000 units per month. Scale that up to U.S.-market volumes, and it rivals the million-plus annual sales Chevy and Ford full-size sedans racked up back in the ’50s and ’60s. But the Grandeur has been a bit player here in the U.S., where it’s badged Azera. That’s partly because Hyundai hasn’t been trying too hard to sell the car, which is only built in Korea, because that plant has its hands full meeting domestic demand. In fact, no U.S. Azeras were built in 2010. All U.S.-bound 2011 Azeras were produced the autumn before, to make room for the new-generation 2012 Hyundai Azera, which has been flying out of dealer showrooms since September over there.

Now that its more popular North American siblings — Sonata and Elantra — have had sufficient time in the Fluidic Sculpture spotlight to spool their respective plants up to max capacity, the 2012 Azera arrives wearing what looks like a mashup of Sonata’s swooping roofline, with the Equus’ Buick-inspired rear shoulder swoosh echoed in the windowsill. Hyundai stylists claim to have been going for a “Grand Glide” theme informed by the mechanics of flight, with features reminiscent of a bald eagle, a 747, or a hang glider, soaring majestically. OK, maybe the tail lamp and instrument panel graphics have a sort of wing-y look about them–overall, it looks fresh, expensive, and unmistakably Hyundai.

Dimensionally the wheelbase and width grow by 2.6 and 0.4 inches (to 112.0 and 73.2) while that coupe-like roof slashes 0.8 inch from the overall height (leaving 57.9). The familiar Lambda 3.3-liter V-6 remains the only engine choice, but gains direct injection, which brings a compression bump from 10.4:1 to 11.5:1, boosting peak power from 260 to 293 horses and torque from 233 to 255 lb-ft while adding 1 mpg to the EPA highway rating (20/29 mpg) spinning through the same six-speed automatic. Chassis-wise, new Sachs Amplitude Selective Dampers vary their damping rate according to the size of the bumps being traversed — soft on the little stuff, firming up as the wheel strokes more, to provide a plush ride with reasonable body motion control.

Hyundai has made its fortune in the U.S. by over-delivering on feature content, and toward that end all Azeras get leather, navigation, a rearview camera, heated front and rear seats, Bluetooth connectivity and Blue Link telematics, nine airbags, 10-way driver/eight-way passenger power seats, proximity key unlocking and starting, LED stop/turn/side-repeater lamps, dual climate control with rear-seat air vents, and 18-inch aluminum wheels. Spring for the tech package and you’ll add a panorama sunroof, 19s, xenon headlamps, front and rear parking sensors, power rear-window and manual rear side glass sunshades, power for the tilt/telescoping wheel, an Infiniti Logic 7 12-speaker sound system with HD radio, and front-seat cushion extenders. That should compare well with the competitive set, which primarily includes the Toyota Avalon, Buick LaCrosse, Nissan Maxima, and Ford Taurus.

Full pricing is not yet available, but the base price of the single-trim-series model will be around $32,000 with arrival in dealer showrooms scheduled for February.

www.motortrend.com

2012 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 R-Spec First Test

Free Price Quote From a Local Dealer

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

Change Car

Select Make Acura Alfa Romeo Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler Dodge Ferrari FIAT Ford Genesis GMC Honda Hyundai Infiniti Jaguar Jeep Karma Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln Lotus Maserati Mazda McLaren Mercedes-Benz MINI Mitsubishi Nissan Porsche Ram Rolls-Royce smart Subaru Tesla Toyota Volkswagen Volvo Select Model Accent Azera Elantra Elantra Coupe Elantra Touring Entourage Equus Genesis Genesis Coupe Ioniq Kona Santa Fe Santa Fe Sport Scoupe Sonata Sonata Hybrid Sonata Plug-in Tiburon Tucson Veloster Veracruz XG300 XG350 GO

Twenty Benjamins. Two large. Two thousand dollars. Any way you put it, throwing that much cash on top of the Genesis 4.6’s $44,500 base price gets you a Hyundai sedan unlike any other. The new 2012 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 R-Spec touts more power, promises stickier grip, and has the most inappropriate name in Hyundai‘s modern-day lineup.

Despite what its label may conjure in enthusiasts’ minds, the R-Spec isn’t a sedan designed to embarrass the curvy-road combatants from Mercedes AMG, Cadillac V, and BMW M. No, the Genesis 5.0 R-Spec is more a sport model than ‘Ring racer. That’s that.

But the R-Spec is a step in the right direction. It gives the standard Genesis much-needed injections of athleticism and emotion. Hyundai engineers provided an all-new direct-injected 5.0-liter Tau V-8 GDI based on the current sedan’s 4.6-liter. Bore grows from 92 mm to 96 mm and compression bumps from 10.4:1 to 11.5:1, resulting in a healthy dose of 429 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque (as opposed to 385 hp and 333 lb-ft from the 4.6).

A new bed plate, camshaft carriers, and roller timing chain reduce mechanical chatter and ensure the eight-cylinder is as fuel-efficient as possible (it’s rated at 16 mpg city/25 mpg highway). An eight-speed automatic transmission with a manual mode directs power to the optional Bridgestone Potenza S-04 Pole Position rubber ($1400). When needed, four-piston front and rear calipers bite hard on 13.6-inch rotors rather than the usual 13.0-inch variety.

While the powertrain adds much to the Genesis’ repertoire, the suspension had staffers talking. Each corner perches on 25- to 30-percent-stiffer Sachs Amplitude Selective Damping shock absorbers. The rear end’s multilink setup is tuned to tauter R-Spec requirements. One-millimeter-thicker anti-roll bars — 26 mm front, 19 mm rear — fight lateral loads under hard cornering.

The finished product surprised us on the real-world blacktop. The R-Spec was composed in and out of corners and wore its 4199 pounds well. Compared to the 4.6, excessive body lean is nearly cured in the 5.0, which pushes when spurred aggressively (thank its burliness and 54/46 front/rear weight distribution). Although weighty and more communicative, the steering still lacks the directness of some of its German rivals.

Its stiffer ride will have you thinking “sports car,” not “luxury sedan.” Off smooth paths, the suspension is confused and bouncy at times, yet capable of absorbing mountainous acne. A week’s worth of passengers complained not once — just don’t expect the Genesis’ usual Lay-Z-Boy ride anymore.

Like the transmission it’s bolted to, the V-8 heart is as smooth and as quiet as they come. While welcome for those who appreciate the subdued nature of a Lexus LS V-8, the R-Spec’s quiet demeanor is a quality that ultimately disappoints — an “R” on the tail necessitates a voice that should be more enticing than a muffled burble.

Even so, here is a Korean sedan as quick to 60 mph as a BMW 550i (4.8 seconds) and faster over a quarter-mile than a Ford Mustang V-6 (13.3 seconds at 107.1 mph vs. 13.7 sec @ 102.0 mph). It demolishes the 4.6’s figure-eight time by nearly 1 second (26.3 seconds at 0.68 g) and consistently stops three feet shorter from 60 mph (109 feet). It also pulls an average 0.87 g on the skidpad (up from 0.86 g).

Sure, the weakly bolstered front thrones are wide enough to seat a beluga, and are no different from those in lesser models. And the blacked-out headlamps, 19-inch wheels, and R-Spec-branded carpets do little to truly distinguish the R-Spec. But in terms of performance, the improvements are undoubtedly impressive.

One thing that MT testing director Kim Reynolds noted during his figure-eight runs: “Though a fun ride overall, turn-in is a very tricky and touchy thing to master, requiring a hefty dosage of quick on-off throttle inputs to induce smooth rotation.” His final assessment? “In the figure-eight the car was fun to drive, but doesn’t live up to its bold R-Spec naming.”

If we were Hyundai, we would have called the R-Spec the Genesis Sport, SE, or something similiarly civilized, saving the R-Spec nomenclature for a sedan with bigger wheels, a lower stance, bespoke styling — and at a minimum — a meaner exhaust note.

Still, that doesn’t mean the extra $2000 isn’t money well spent…

2012 Hyundai Genesis R-Spec
BASE PRICE $47,350
PRICE AS TESTED $48,785
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front engine, RWD, 5-pass, 4-door sedan
ENGINE 5.0L/429-hp/376-lb-ft DOHC 32-valve V-8
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4199 lb (54/46%)
WHEELBASE 115.6 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 196.3 x 74.4 x 58.3 in
0-60 MPH 4.8 sec
QUARTER MILE 13.3 sec @ 107.1 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 109 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.87 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 26.3 sec @ 0.68 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY FUEL ECON 16/25 mpg
ENERGY CONSUMPTION, CITY/HWY 211/135 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS 1.02 lb/mile

www.motortrend.com

2012 Hyundai Equus Ultimate First Test

Free Price Quote From a Local Dealer

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

Change Car

Select Make Acura Alfa Romeo AM General AMC American Motors Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CODA Daewoo Datsun De Tomaso Dodge Eagle Factory Five Racing Ferrari FIAT Fisker Ford Genesis Geo GMC Honda Hummer Hyundai Infiniti International Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Karma Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln Lotus Mack Maserati Maybach Mazda McLaren Mercedes-Benz Mercury MINI Mitsubishi Morris Nissan Oldsmobile Plymouth Pontiac Porsche Ram Rolls-Royce Saab Saleen Saturn Scion smart SRT Studebaker Subaru Suzuki Tesla Toyota Vincent Volkswagen Volvo Willys Select Model Accent Azera Elantra Elantra Coupe Elantra Touring Entourage Equus Genesis Genesis Coupe Ioniq Kona Santa Fe Santa Fe Sport Scoupe Sonata Sonata Hybrid Sonata Plug-in Tiburon Tucson Veloster Veracruz XG300 XG350 GO

The 2012 Hyundai Equus Ultimate is a reasonably executed flagship luxury sedan — but should anyone care? Flagship luxury and sound financial sense just don’t go together, and that’s what makes the 2012 Hyundai Equus Ultimate so tough to review.

Pricewise, the $66,650 Equus Ultimate — the more expensive of two trims — competes with midsize luxury sedans like the Mercedes-Benz E550 and Infiniti M56, but no one is going to cross-shop those vehicles. That leaves the Equus fighting cars like the Lexus LS 460 and Mercedes-Benz S550 — vehicles that, even in their old age, can stifle the 2012 Equus’ arguments for rational luxury on a price-independent level.

Hyundai‘s first attempt at improving the Equus comes just one year after the model debuted in the U.S., and it receives the automaker’s new 5.0-liter direct-injection V-8 producing 429 hp and 376 lb-ft of torque. The engine also is available for the Genesis sedan. It’s mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission (the 2011 Equus employed a six-speed automatic and a 385-hp, 4.6-liter V-8) that sends power to the rear wheels — there’s no all-wheel-drive model.

Aside from giving Equus owners more to brag about at dinner parties (“My Hyundai is more powerful than your Lexus and Mercedes!”), the added power and transmission have a noticeable effect on test numbers. Acceleration from 0-60 mph takes 5.5 seconds for the 2012 Equus, a 0.7-second improvement over last year’s model. That’s half a second faster than a 2011 Lexus LS 460, and 0.2 second slower than a 2009 Mercedes-Benz S550 we tested. As a bonus, the power delivery is relatively smooth. Jackrabbit starts aren’t a problem and the eight-speed automatic rarely felt out of place in normal driving.

The new 5.0-liter’s strengths continue in the quarter mile, where at 13.9 seconds, the 2012 Equus is 0.7 second quicker than the 2011 model, with a 102.7 trap speed 4.0 mph higher than the outgoing Equus. On the road, the new V-8 emits a muffled roar only at wide-open throttle; otherwise, it’s quiet inside, as you’d expect from a car in this class. Braking performance is only so-so. The 4659-pound sedan hauls down from 60 mph at 124 feet. That trails the LS 460 and S550, which stopped in 119 and 115 feet, respectively.

Since the Equus is going after the comfort and isolation of a Lexus and not the connectedness of a BMW, it should come as little surprise that the 2012 Equus feels out of place during spirited canyon driving. It doesn’t take much to get the tires howling, and there’s plenty of body roll for all four passengers. On the figure-eight course, the 2012 Equus trails the LS 460 and S550 (in that order), but bests the 2011 Equus, completing the Motor Trend test in 27.1 seconds at 0.66 g.

On the track, associate road test editor Carlos Lago found the traction and stability control systems overly intrusive. “I could get a decent amount of rotation on corner entry, but ESC quickly shut it down. Understeers after that,” he noted. “Can’t exit corner quickly thanks to ESC. Brakes felt overworked after two laps. A ton of engine, like an old and powerful Benz. Point and shoot.”

Unlike an old Benz, however, the four-seat Equus Ultimate has a massaging function for the driver’s seat and the passenger-side rear seat, which also gets a remote for more control. Sun shades on the rear side windows and rear windshield are included in the Ultimate trim, as is an 8-inch rear seat display screen. Both rear seats have full power controls and heating and cooling functions, but the passenger-side rear seat power footrest is only useful for chauffeuring a short passenger if someone is seated up front. There are redundant controls to move the front passenger seat forward when no one’s up there.

There’s nothing particularly outstanding about the cabin as whole, although it’s a pleasant place to sit in traffic. The interior controls are logically laid out, and while its microfiber suede headliner is luxo-chic, the flimsy plastic panel below the gear stalk is not so chic. The radar-guided cruise control doesn’t work in stop-and-go traffic–when you come to a stop, the system will deactivate. A lane departure warning system is standard, but curiously, a blind spot monitoring system isn’t. The power trunk lid is a useful feature.

Unlike recent Hyundai designs like the Veloster and even the Elantra, the Equus isn’t jaw-dropping, but judging by the reactions we got from passersby, it isn’t a wallflower either. Like the mug on the Genesis sedan, the Equus’ badge-less grille is more awkward than awe-inspiring, and its front-view camera pokes out like a mole on the tip of your nose. But it does roll on attractive 19-inch chrome wheels as standard equipment. And owners of the Equus will never visit a dealer–the car can be picked up from a home or business and replaced with a loaner until the Equus is fixed. Cool.

Has Hyundai done to Lexus what Lexus did to Mercedes-Benz in the early 1990s? Not quite. Though the car is already exceeding the automaker’s low sales expectations, total volume through the first 11 months of the year is 2868 units (its first full month of sales was January 2011). It still has a ways to go before it can challenge the well-established Lexus LS 460 (8512 units) and Mercedes-Benz S-Class (11,185 units).

When you’re playing in the $60,000 and above range, there’s a special X factor that becomes increasingly important, and that’s what the Equus arguably lacks — although given Hyundai’s continuous improvement, that might not be the case in another decade. But for now, the 2012 Equus will more than suffice as the brand’s flagship luxury sedan offering.

2012 Hyundai Equus
BASE PRICE $59,650
PRICE AS TESTED $66,650
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front engine, RWD, 4-pass, 4-door sedan
ENGINE 5.0L/429-hp/376-lb-ft DOHC 32-valve V-8
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4659 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 119.9 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 203.1 x 74.4 x 58.7 in
0-60 MPH 5.5 sec
QUARTER MILE 13.9 sec @ 102.7 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 124 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.83 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 27.1 sec @ 0.66 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY FUEL ECON 15/23 mpg
ENERGY CONSUMPTION, CITY/HWY 225/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS 1.09 lb/mile

www.motortrend.com

2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T R-Spec First Test

Free Price Quote From a Local Dealer

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

Change Car

Select Make Acura Alfa Romeo AM General AMC American Motors Aston Martin Audi Bentley BMW Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Chrysler CODA Daewoo Datsun De Tomaso Dodge Eagle Factory Five Racing Ferrari FIAT Fisker Ford Genesis Geo GMC Honda Hummer Hyundai Infiniti International Isuzu Jaguar Jeep Karma Kia Lamborghini Land Rover Lexus Lincoln Lotus Mack Maserati Maybach Mazda McLaren Mercedes-Benz Mercury MINI Mitsubishi Morris Nissan Oldsmobile Plymouth Pontiac Porsche Ram Rolls-Royce Saab Saleen Saturn Scion smart SRT Studebaker Subaru Suzuki Tesla Toyota Vincent Volkswagen Volvo Willys Select Model Accent Azera Elantra Elantra Coupe Elantra Touring Entourage Equus Genesis Genesis Coupe Ioniq Kona Santa Fe Santa Fe Sport Scoupe Sonata Sonata Hybrid Sonata Plug-in Tiburon Tucson Veloster Veracruz XG300 XG350 GO

It was an odd thing. I was going through my notes about the all-new 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T R-Spec, and the notes given to me by fellow editors, when I realized something. Everything I was reading I had read before. Then I read through some notes from our 2010 Car of the Year event, as I was the one who did the write-up for the all-new 2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 and 2.0T. The notes were identical, even though they were written by different people more than two years apart.

Then and now, the shifter in the Genesis Coupe does not like to be rushed, and there were multiple editors who experienced trouble with the manual transmission during our drive. Specifically, when trying to quickly get from third to second gear in the canyons or on the track. The shifter is vague and doesn’t provide good resistance between gates, which caused many of the drivers to hang a gear. You have to take your time while shifting, which doesn’t really fit with a track-oriented production car.

And just like before, the opinions of the exterior and interior styling are identical: The inside doesn’t match what the outside promises. Outside, the car has a very aggressive look, with sleek lines and a muscular stance. The interior, though improved, still feels cheap, with an abundance of hard plastic. “It’s a shame Hyundai can’t get anything better-looking and -feeling inside of its sharp-looking cars,” wrote associate editor Nate Martinez. Like in the original, ride quality was good, providing a smooth highway feel while still being competent when you started turning left and right. But there is still room for improvement.

The 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T’s more powerful engine is a bright spot. The 2.0-liter mill was given a new twin-scroll turbocharger and larger, more efficient intercooler that helps boost output and increases fuel efficiency. When it debuted in 2010, the Genesis Coupe 2.0T put out a measly 210 hp and 223 lb-ft. Hyundai turned up the wick on the new engine, now putting out 274 hp and 275 lb-ft. That’s an extra 64 hp and 52 lb-ft, a much welcome and much needed improvement.

More power usually equates to better performance numbers, and the Genesis Coupe 2.0T definitely delivers in this category. The 2013 Gen Coupe would kill its predecessor in a drag race, at 5.7 seconds to 60 mph and 14.2 seconds at 98.4 mph in the quarter mile compared to the 2010’s 6.8 seconds to 60 mph and 15.3 seconds at 90.9 mph in the quarter mile. Our figure eight proved Hyundai made sure the new car could put down its newfound power. This car did the deed in 25.5 seconds at 0.69 g and a 0.97 g of lateral grip, while the 2010 model ran 26.8 seconds at 0.65 g with a 0.91 lateral g.

But now, just like then, with the newly found good comes some newly found bad. While we always like more power, we have issues with the power delivery. The extra torque means you don’t have to downshift to pass while on the freeway, but it’s very non-linear, and there is noticeable turbo lag. When you’re out of boost the car labors, then the turbo comes on like gangbusters, making it tough to be smooth mid-corner. Then there’s the engine/driveline safety management system, which isn’t near as bad as it used to be, but it’s still there. The saving grace is you can still fully defeat stability and traction control, letting you get as sideways as you want, but when the nanny is on, it’s overly aggressive.

Hyundai has built a better Gen Coupe 2.0T, but many of the initial issues we had are still there, though they’re less noticeable. The exterior styling and ride quality are on par with its competition, but the interior quality and drivetrain still need some fine-tuning. Let’s hope the third time is a charm when Hyundai gives us another iteration of the Genesis Coupe 2.0T in a year or two.

2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T R-Spec
BASE PRICE $25,125
PRICE AS TESTED $26,605
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front engine, RWD, 4-pass, 2-door coupe
ENGINE 2.0L/274-hp/275-lb-ft turbo DOHC 16-valve I-4
TRANSMISSION 6-speed manual
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 3399 lb (55/45%)
WHEELBASE 111.0 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 182.3 x 73.4 x 54.5 in
0-60 MPH 5.7 sec
QUARTER MILE 14.2 sec @ 98.4 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 111 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.97 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 25.5 sec @ 0.69 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY FUEL ECON 21/30 mpg
ENERGY CONS., CITY/HWY 160/112 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS 0.80 lb/mile

www.motortrend.com

Casio XJ-M250 - Projeksiyon Teknolojisinde Devrim, CASIO Laser & Led Projeksiyon, 20.000 Saat Ik mr, 3.000 ANSI Lmen Parlaklk

Grnt Teknoloji: 0.65-in DLP ip znrlk: WXGA 1280 x 800 Piksel Grnt Yansmas Parlaklk: 3,000 ANSI lmen Kontrast Oran: 1.800 : 1 Renk Derinlii: 16.7 Milyon Projeksiyon Lensi Tip: 1,5x Optik Zoom (El ile) Projeksiyon Oran: 1.32-1.93 : 1 (Uzaklk : Grnt Genilii) Offset: 83% Min. Uzaklk: 1 m Projeksiyon Projeksiyon Ekran Bykl: 30" ~ 300" Ekran Kegen 60": 1.7 m ~ 2.5 m Ekran Kegen 100": 2.9 m ~ 4.9 m Ik Kayna Tip: Lazer ve LED Hibrid Ik Teknoloji alma Sresi: Yaklak 20,000 saat (3 Yl veya 6,000 Saat Garantili) Keystone Dzeltme Dikey (Otomatik / El ile): + 30° / ±30° Arabirimler Bilgisayar: 1x15 Pin D-Sub RGB Girii Dijital Giri: HDMI Girii Video: 1 x S-Video, 1 x RCA (Kompozit) Komponent Video Girii: Ops. evirici 15-Pin Ses: 3.5 mm Stereo Jak 1 x Giri 1 x k, RCA Tip x 1 RS-232C Seri Arayz: 1 x 9-Pin mini D-Sub Ses Hoparlr: 5W alma Ses Seviyesi Default 33 dB Gvenli Mod: 28 dB G Tketimi alrken: 190W(Eco Kapal)/150W(Eco Ak) Bekleme: 0.4 W Bilgisayar Uyumluluu Sktrlm Maks. znrlk: UXGA (1600 x 1200 pixels) Video Uyumluluu Video Standartlar: PAL-N/-M, PAL60, SECAM, NTSC; sinyaller: kompozit video, YcbCr, YPbPr Paket erii erik: RGB Kablosu, Video Kablosu, Elektrik Kablosu, Uzaktan Kumanda, Kullanm CDsi , Tama antas Dier zellikler Boyutlar (U x G x Y): 311x244x82mm Arlk: 3.9 kg Cihaz Rengi: Beyaz

www.casioprojeksiyon.com


Смотрите также