2010 Hyundai Tucson Review. Хендай tucson 2010


Hyundai Tucson (2010) - pictures, information & specs

In 2010, a revolutionary new Hyundai Tucson joins the rapidly evolving Hyundai product line. The sleek crossover from Hyundai, with its athletic European design, strikes a stark contrast from its predecessor and improves in every functional area, from its roomier cabin with extra cargo space to its leap in fuel economy and technology. Hyundai Tucson features the company's "Fluidic Sculpture" design language and is the first vehicle in Hyundai's 24/7 version 2.0 product initiative (seven all-new models by the end of 2011).

The all-new Hyundai Tucson is the first Hyundai CUV (Crossover Utility Vehicle) to be designed and engineered in Europe at Hyundai's Frankfurt-based design and technical centers. It features precedent-setting engineering including advanced weight saving technology and the eco-efficient Theta II 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine delivering up to 31 mpg on the highway. True to Hyundai form, the Hyundai Tucson applies life-saving safety technologies as standard equipment while offering, for the first time, Downhill Brake Control (DBC) and Hillstart Assist Control (HAC). Likewise, to keep its passengers informed and comfortable Tucson integrates Hyundai's first panoramic sunroof, touch-screen navigation and a Bluetooth® hands-free phone system.

Key attributes of Hyundai's Fluidic Sculpture design philosophy are the athleticism and sophistication that Hyundai Tucson demonstrates through its flowing lines, full surfaces and muscular presence. This athletic design language is highlighted by bold, dynamic graphic elements such as the new Hyundai family hexagonal front grille, aggressive lower air intake, sculptured hood creases, swept back headlights, sleek greenhouse and wraparound taillights. Chrome grille accents and door handles lend sophistication to the top-of-the-line Tucson Limited.

Conceived in a global collaboration among Hyundai's U.S., Korean and European advanced product groups, with design execution led by the Frankfurt studio, the new Hyundai Tucson was developed as an urban cruiser. It is tough and compact for life in the city, yet sleek and agile for out-of-town travel.

The Hyundai Tucson combines dynamic, sculpted, performance-oriented styling with thoughtful everyday utility to create a vehicle that will change the way consumers, especially younger car buyers, think about compact crossovers.

With an overall length of 173.2 inches, a width of 71.7 inches and a height of 66.3 inches (with roof rails), Hyundai Tucson has a great stance and road presence. The design team fused a light, elegant and sporty upper body with belt lines flowing off both the front and rear wheel arches, to a tough, planted lower body so that it is assertive in the way it sits on the road.

The profile of Hyundai Tucson features a sports car-like theme with a double-zigzag treatment for the wheel arches that wrap around the available Euroflange 18-inch alloy wheels. The concave sills have a wedge-shaped profile that extends rearward and wraps around into the rear bumper, a first of its kind design in a vehicle of this type. The profile is further enhanced by modern silver roof rails.

2010 TUCSON 61 POUNDS LIGHTER THAN THE OUTGOING MODEL DESPITE BEING THREE INCHES LONGER

World-class weight efficiency was one of the program targets for the Hyundai Tucson engineering team. In fact, the 2010 Tucson leads all of its competitors in weight efficiency. Hyundai engineers also targeted leadership in power-to-weight ratio. Having these targets paid huge dividends in both performance and fuel economy.

The Hyundai Tucson's widespread use of high-strength steel provides increased strength at a lower body weight. High-strength steel allows the four-wheel independent suspension to work optimally. At 3,203 pounds for an automatic transmission model, the Tucson is lighter than its competitors, while offering more interior room than Rogue and Escape, with body-bending rigidity 38 percent higher than the Rogue. The Tucson owes its 31 mpg estimated EPA highway rating to its weight efficient unibody architecture.

FUN-TO-DRIVE

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson's athletic shape is now complemented with more agile handling, responsive steering and improved body roll control. These enhancements make the new Tucson more fun-to-drive. Hyundai Tucson uses MacPherson strut front and multi-link rear suspension systems for more precise wheel control and a smoother ride. All four wheels are controlled by coil springs and fade-resistant gas-charged dampers. Stabilizer bar diameters have also increased. The front suspension now has a new 25 mm hollow stabilizer bar to save weight versus the predecessors 21 mm solid stabilizer bar. The rear suspension has a new 18 mm solid stabilizer bar versus the predecessors 14 mm stabilizer bar. Larger stabilizer bars keep the vehicle very flat during cornering and help provide quick turn-in response.

Rack-and-pinion Motor-Driven Power Steering (MDPS) also contributes to the Hyundai Tucson's nimble and refined handling dynamics while saving fuel and reducing interior noise. The MDPS system uses the vehicle's electrical system for power (unlike the older hydraulic system), allowing for increased fuel economy and calibrated steering efforts through all vehicle speed ranges.

Due to the suspension geometry and wider track width that enables greater turn angles, Tucson's turning circle is 34.7 feet - an advantage Hyundai Tucson drivers will appreciate in their daily driving and parking. In fact, Tucson's turning diameter bests Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4.

TUCSON DELIVERS BETTER FUEL ECONOMY THAN CR-V

The Hyundai Tucson was engineered to be more fuel efficient than its predecessor and chief competitors like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. The 2010 Tucson accomplishes this while being 3.3 inches longer and one inch wider than its predecessor and having a longer wheelbase than Honda CR-V, Ford Escape and Subaru Forester

Hyundai Tucson features the Theta II 2.4-liter DOHC inline four-cylinder engine. The Theta II engine delivers about the same amount of power and acceleration as its predecessor's V6 engine with 20 percent better fuel economy than the old four-cylinder engine. In fact, the Tucson is more fuel-efficient than Honda CRV, Nissan Rogue, Toyota RAV4 and Ford Escape four-cylinder engines boasting an impressive estimated 23 mpg city/31 mpg highway fuel economy rating with the available six-speed automatic transmission with SHIFTRONIC® and front wheel drive. Tucson features low rolling resistance silica tires to contribute to the 31 mpg highway. With AWD (All-Wheel Drive), Tucson delivers an estimated 21 mpg city/28 mpg highway exceeding the primary competitors AWD versions including Subaru Forester.

The Theta II is rated at 176 horsepower (26 percent more than its predecessor) and 168 lb.-ft. of torque. This high-tech, all-aluminum, 16-valve engine features Continuously Variable Valve Timing (CVVT) on both camshafts and a Variable Induction System (VIS) for better engine breathing. In the green states, the 2010 Hyundai Tucson is certified as a Partial Zero Emission Vehicle (PZEV) which means it is as clean as a hybrid.

For the 2011 model year, Hyundai will introduce a high-mileage Blue model. The Blue model will be powered by a Theta II 2.0-liter engine that delivers better power and fuel economy than the 2009 Hyundai Tucson Beta four-cylinder engine. The 2.0-liter Theta-II has shed over 22 pounds from its previous iteration. For better fuel efficiency and reduced emissions, the 2.0-liter Theta-II also gets Dual CVVT (intake and exhaust camshaft phaser) while Theta-I was equipped with only CVVT on the intake camshaft. Major improvements also begin with the application of a two-stage Variable Intake System (VIS) which enables switching between long and short intake manifold resulting in an across-the-board performance increase. To reduce internal friction, engineers have applied a Diamond-Like-Coating (DLC) to the top surface of the valve tappets resulting in improved fuel efficiency. Engineers also expended considerable time and effort optimizing the oil pressure to achieve an ideal balance between durability and fuel economy.

Hyundai Tucson will join the Blue lineup of vehicles that includes Accent and Elantra. Tucson Blue will deliver outstanding fuel economy without adding hundreds of dollars to the price. In fact, the "Blue" model will be priced lower than other Tucson models, assuring it will be both efficient and economical. Hyundai is focused on achieving an excellent mpg-per-dollar ratio with the Hyundai Tucson Blue model. Fuel-efficient modifications will likely include low-rolling-resistance tires, enhanced aerodynamics, revised engine calibrations and reduced final drive ratios to deliver even higher mileage and lower emissions. The new Tucson high mileage edition will be identified with unique "Blue" badging.

FUEL ECONOMY INNOVATIONS

To help Hyundai Tucson drivers get the most out of their vehicles, Hyundai added a standard trip computer and economy indicator. The trip computer provides distance to empty, average fuel consumption, average vehicle speed, elapsed time and instant fuel economy. The "Eco Indicator" on automatic transmission models nestled between the speedometer and tachometer displays a green LED light in accordance with fuel-efficient driving behavior. Fuel savings in the range of 15 to 17 percent are attainable with the automatic Eco Indicator. Manual transmission models have a shift indicator to inform drivers of the optimal time to upshift and downshift. Fuel savings in the range 7 to 9 percent are attainable with the manual Eco Gear Shift Indicator.

Further gains in fuel efficiency have been realized by the Motor-Driven Power Steering system which delivers excellent responsiveness and accurate handling.

SIX-SPEED AUTOMATIC AND MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS

Hyundai's commitment to making the Hyundai Tucson extremely fuel efficient continues with a six-speed automatic transmission with SHIFTRONIC® manual control or a standard six-speed manual transaxle.

Hyundai's all-new six-speed automatic transaxle helps the company meet its goals of improving fuel efficiency and reducing emissions. Shifts are silky-smooth with an option of manual control through the SHIFTRONIC feature. Designed for transverse engine applications in passenger cars and SUVs, the new compact transmission puts Hyundai into an elite class of auto manufacturers who have designed their own proprietary six-speed automatic transmissions. The strength of the design is its unique layout which makes it smaller, more compact and lighter than any other six-speed on the market today.

For the customer, the new six-speed delivers a performance edge. In this application (FWD/A/T), it helps bring a 24 percent gain in highway fuel economy (31 mpg versus 25 mpg in the '09).

There is no dipstick in the gearbox because it is filled with automatic transmission fluid that is good for the life of the vehicle under normal usage conditions, thereby reducing maintenance costs.

Developed over a four-year period, this new six-speed automatic is 26.4 pounds lighter than Hyundai's five-speed. It also is 1.6 inches shorter and considerably simpler having 62 fewer parts, which is a key to increased durability, lighter weight and lower cost.

When it comes to transmissions, more gears are definitely better. The addition of a sixth gear enables closer spacing between gear ratios providing a better balance of performance and fuel economy while the wide overall gear ratio helps deliver strong acceleration.

The gearbox has three planetary gearsets and a unique flat torque converter which shortens the unit's overall length by 0.47 inches. Four pinion differentials improve durability and further minimize size.

Another example of engineering ingenuity is found in the design of the hydraulic pressure control unit. Because there are always slight manufacturing deviations from one solenoid valve to the next which cause fluctuation in the hydraulic pressure and affect shift precision and quality, the transaxle features cleverly integrated adjustment screws in the valves which enable each of the eight valves to be calibrated at the factory. This feature ensures stable hydraulic pressure at any shift point which facilitates a high degree of precision and control needed to deliver fast, smooth and precise shifts throughout the rpm range.

CAPABLE FOR OUT-OF-TOWN TRAVEL

To make the Hyundai Tucson even more versatile, Hyundai engineers added an advanced electronic AWD system designed by JTEKT. The AWD system will automatically activate under any driving condition when needed, distributing the power equally and optimizing driving performance. Under normal driving, the system only distributes power to the front wheels thereby reducing fuel consumption. The system includes a driver-selectable AWD lock allowing for a 50/50 torque split between the front and rear wheels for off-road and very slippery conditions.

For even more driver control, the 2010 Tucson features Hyundai's first Hillstart Assist Control (HAC) and Downhill Brake Control (DBC). HAC is designed to minimize rolling backwards on steep ascents. By selecting the DBC switch, the Hydro-Electronic Control unit manages the wheel speed sensors, steering angle sensor and acceleration sensor to maintain control and speed on steep declines without having to use the brake. Neither of these controls are available on CR-V, Escape or Rogue and are typically found on luxury SUVs with much higher price tags.

THOUGHTFUL INTERIOR DESIGN

Inside, the five-seat Hyundai Tucson offers a commanding view of the road and evokes an adventurous ambience that is also laid-back and relaxing. The needs of the driver are fully accommodated, with the interior blending aspects of the outdoors and an urban lifestyle. For example, Hyundai's first panoramic sunroof brings the outside "inside" for all passengers.

An X-shaped visual theme is repeated across numerous areas of the cabin while metal paint accents provide flashes of visual brilliance.

Shapely seats feature center panels trimmed in breathable fabric with attractive and functional cushion side bolsters, plus additional lateral support for occupants' shoulders. On the insert of the cloth seats, there is a hexagonal pattern stitched into the fabric matching the new front grille design.

The long wheelbase and generous width of the Tucson, combined with Hyundai's expertise in interior packaging, have produced an interior that delivers class-leading rear legroom and improved headroom. These improvements were accomplished while lowering the overall height of the vehicle. The Hyundai Tucson now has more passenger volume than Rogue and Escape at 101.9 cubic feet. Tucson's cargo capacity is 13 percent greater than its predecessor. In fact, Hyundai Tucson has more interior volume than Acura RDX, and more cargo volume than Infiniti FX. The spacious cabin on Tucson Limited is further enhanced for all passengers by Hyundai's first available panoramic sunroof with UV blocking. The front panel of the sunroof can either tilt open or open completely by sliding up and over the rear panel. An anti-pinch system guards against injuries. Finally, with the extra wheelbase length, Hyundai engineers were able to expand front seat tracks allowing taller drivers a comfortable seating position.

The high-tech cockpit comes standard with Hyundai's signature blue lighting, power windows, power door locks, fold-away mirrors and remote keyless entry with alarm and panic button. Bluetooth hands-free phone system with voice recognition and steering wheel audio and cruise controls are also available. Another premium feature in the Hyundai Tucson Limited is a CleanAir Ionizer that automatically cleans the air when the heater or air conditioner is running.

Other available features include leather seating surfaces, heated front seats, power driver seat with lumbar support, automatic headlights, side repeater exterior mirrors, front wiper de-icer and dual front automatic temperature control.

Audiophiles will love Tucson's 160-watt AM/FM/XM/CD/MP3 audio system with six speakers. This system includes XM Satellite Radio® and iPod®/USB auxiliary inputs as standard equipment. When an iPod or flash drive is connected through the USB port, which is located in the storage tray, not only does it play music through the vehicle's six-speaker audio system, but it also charges the iPod and allows the driver to access tracks with the steering wheel audio controls. This system also allows both driver and passengers to easily view song/artist/title information and control the music from the audio head unit rather than only the iPod itself.

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson can be further upgraded with an optional navigation system with rearview camera. Shifting into reverse automatically turns on the rear-view camera that provides a wide-angle view reducing the risk of accidents. This navigation system also provides Bluetooth streaming audio capability. This easy-to-use unit can be controlled via a 6.5-inch LCD touch-screen or voice-activation by headliner-mounted microphone. The voice recognition allows the user to control the navigation system, audio system and phone commands. The system comes matched with the 360-watt premium audio system that includes an external amplifier and subwoofer. It plays compact discs, accesses digital music files employing Bluetooth streaming audio or allows driver and passenger to access their personal listening devices through the iPod/USB/auxiliary inputs. Bluetooth audio wirelessly streams music from a phone to the audio system. And with a Bluetooth-enabled phone, a local restaurant can be called for reservations before plotting the route. The XM Satellite Radio interface is also integrated into the navigation unit and features channel logos and real-time NavTraffic with detour function. XM Satellite Radio and NavTraffic service are complimentary for the first 90 days.

ADVANCED STANDARD SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES: PART OF HYUNDAI'S ASSURANCE COMMITMENT

The 2005 Tucson was the first Hyundai model to feature standard ESC (Electronic Stability Control) upon its launch in fall 2004. It was also the first vehicle under $20,000 with standard ESC and six airbags. The Tucson started Hyundai's approach to combining state-of-the-art safety and affordability and this approach lives on in the 2010 Hyundai Tucson. The Tucson is loaded with life-saving standard safety features including ESC with traction control, six airbags and active front head restraints. Its braking system features four-wheel disc brakes controlled by an advanced four-channel ABS with Brake Assist, providing maximum braking force when a panic stop is detected, and Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) to optimize brake performance with uneven weight distribution.

ESC compares the driver's intended course with the vehicle's actual response. If needed, ESC then brakes individual front or rear wheels and/or reduces engine power to help correct understeer or oversteer. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) studies show SUVs equipped with ESC experience 67 percent fewer single-vehicle crashes, and 63 percent fewer single-vehicle fatalities. In addition, a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that ESC reduces the risk of all fatal collisions by 52 percent and the risk of fatal single-vehicle rollovers of SUVs by 80 percent.

The Hyundai Tucson is engineered to provide its passengers with multiple defensive safety layers. The steel unibody has integrated crumple zones and a high-tensile front sub-frame designed to work together to reduce the forces that typically reach the passenger compartment. Particular attention has been paid to increasing the stiffness of the front side members which have been enlarged and straightened. Also, the center pillars serve as the anchors of a new ring structure which improves overall side structure stiffness while also creating more room for the door armrest and seat. All four doors also have internal guard beams to protect passengers in a side-impact collision.

The entire body shell has been made stiffer and lighter thanks to its extensive use of ultra-high tensile strength steel, which comprises 68.9 percent of the shell compared to its predecessor's 57.3 percent. Also, the use of Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) has been expanded on key structural members. TWB assemblies combine steels of different thickness and grades using a sophisticated laser welding and stamping process to achieve an optimal stiffness-to-weight ratio. TWBs reduce body weight while enhancing crash energy management. These safety systems are expected to earn the 2010 Tucson NHTSA's top five-star crash test rating for front and side impacts.

Hyundai Tucson's standard front-seat active head restraints help prevent whiplash by automatically reducing the space between a front occupant's head and the head restraint during certain rear collisions and are highly recommended by safety organizations such as the IIHS.

The Tucson's passenger restraint systems also help minimize injury. Three-point belts are provided at all five seating positions, and the front seatbelts have pretensioners and load limiters. There are two outboard rear Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) child-seat anchors.

Elongated flush-mounted headlamps not only add a strong sense of style but also feature projector beam lenses for improved night-time driving safety. Side mirror housings have been modified to reduce wind noise and also feature an integrated repeater lamp for improved visibility on the Limited trim.

A total of six airbags are positioned in the Hyundai Tucson's interior. Dual advanced frontal airbags are complemented by front seat-mounted side-impact airbags and roof-mounted side-curtain airbags with new rollover sensors that cover both the front and rear seat rows. The combination of side and curtain airbags, which help protect the head and body during side impacts, can reduce fatalities by more than 45 percent, according to the IIHS.

Hyundai Tucson also features a standard Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) which alerts drivers if one or more tires are under inflated.

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2010 Hyundai Tucson Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

TheCarConnection.com's editors have driven the new 2010 Hyundai Tucson to bring you this firsthand road test. Editors have compared the new Tucson with other compact crossovers and have compiled a companion full review of quotes from other sources in a comprehensive look at the new Tucson.

High Gear Media accepted travel expenses to attend the first drive of the 2010 Hyundai Tucson.

It's been a banner year for Hyundai. The Korean automaker has introduced its new Genesis sedan in the Genesis Coupe and has shown off a new Sonata sedan that's in the works for the 2011 model year. On top of all those new products, it also has a brand-new 2010 Hyundai Tucson ready to go on sale-and this time, it's aimed directly at the likes of the Honda CR-V and Ford Escape. With a base price of less than $20,000, the new Tucson has gone on sale with a choice of front- or all-wheel drive, manual or automatic transmission, as well as a sole four-cylinder engine powering both the GLS and Limited versions.

Looks aren't deceiving; the 2010 Hyundai Tucson smartly steps to the front of the compact-crossover class with a curved, crested, upscale design. The sheetmetal is nearly the reverse of the past Tucson's bland, upright style sheet. It no longer bears much visual resemblance to anything you might see in Tucson, Ariz., for good reason: The look comes from its European design studios, teamed with those in Korea and the United States, with perhaps more than a casual nod to the Nissan Rogue and the Euro-market Ford Kuga. Some versions have more chrome trim work around the grille and sides, while all editions have black trim that cuts the visual height of the doors on the side view. From its nose to its tail, the Tucson appears compact and edgy, while the rear end has visual mass that's cut somewhat by angular tail lamps. Inside, the 2010 Tucson steps into the thick of global interior design with a big LCD screen, flanked by chromed vents, and dashes of metallic-painted plastic breaking up plenty of tightly grained, hard black plastic. It's not quite in the same class as the Rogue or CR-V, but the Tucson's interior is at least as nicely executed as that in the Escape and on par with the Toyota RAV4.

Review continues below

The 2010 Tucson moves in a more economical, fuel-efficient direction for power. With either front- or all-wheel drive, all 2010 Tucsons come with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine with 176 hp and 168 pound-feet of torque. Next year, Hyundai will offer a Tucson Blue model with a 2.0-liter four and slightly better fuel economy: a turbocharged four-cylinder. The available four-cylinder propels the Tucson quicker than, say, the Honda CR-V to 60 mph, but a rough reading of speed puts its 0-60 mph time in the 10-second range. It feels more sluggish from a standstill than at highway speeds, and the engine is at least smooth and relatively vibration-free. Either a six-speed automatic or six-speed manual gearbox can be fitted; the manual transmission has a long throw but smooth action, while the six-speed automatic has a sport-shift mode but no paddles at fingertip reach, so it's a rare occasion you'll actually engage the sport mode. The automatic will account for almost 95 percent of all Tucson sales, Hyundai says, and it's fine for most urban duties, with reasonably quick responses to throttle changes.

TheCarConnection.com's editors find the Tucson's ride quality pleasant enough, especially in the backseat, but the feel of its engine-speed-sensitive electric power steering leaves editors unimpressed despite its tight 34.7-foot turning circle. Braking pedal feel is lacking, too, though the Tucson comes standard with anti-lock control. In general, the Tucson's road manners are significantly improved over the prior edition. Fuel economy is 23/31 mpg for front-drive versions, and 21/28 mpg for all-wheel-drive Tucsons-a good measure better than in the Honda CR-V or Escape.

At 173.2 inches long, 71.7 inches wide, and 66.3 inches tall, the 2010 Hyundai Tucson has a longer wheelbase and is wider than the Honda CR-V, Ford Escape, and Subaru Forester. And while it offers more interior room than the Nissan Rogue and Ford Escape, the Tucson has slightly less interior and cargo room than the Honda CR-V, and it's significantly smaller inside than the Toyota RAV4-though Hyundai points out it offers more interior room than a BMW X3 or an Acura RDX. Editors at TheCarConnection.com find the Tucson's front seat space very good with plenty of legroom, but the leather seats fitted to some test cars have a sloping bottom cushion that grows uncomfortable quickly. In the back, plenty of room for adults is available, and though the seat cushions could be longer, it's clear the Tucson's cloth seats are better choices than the leather-clad ones, at least for now. Cargo room is large enough for medium-size pets, a significant amount of luggage, or enough groceries for a family of four for a week, though the Toyota RAV4 offers enough room for a third-row seat. Interior storage is well planned inside the Tucson, with cubbies and bottle holders in the console and door panels, and a deep glove box up front. The fit and finish of our prototype test vehicles was generally good-a vast improvement over the previous Tucson-though hard plastic is the rule of the cabin trim, not the exception.

In terms of safety, the 2010 Tucson has all the expected standard equipment. That list includes dual front side and curtain airbags; anti-lock brakes; and traction and stability control. Hyundai officials anticipate the Tucson will score very well in federal crash tests, but no official results are available as of yet--though the IIHS rates it a "Top Safety Pick." Hill descent control is also standard, along with brake assist, tire pressure monitors, and active headrests. Visibility is good, save for some dark corners at the rear quarters of the Tucson, where its dashing roofline meets the tailgate.

Hyundai is sparing few features from the Tucson's standard-equipment list. It's extremely well-fitted, particularly for its price class. Each Tucson comes with power windows, locks, and mirrors; remote keyless entry; cloth seats; air conditioning; and an AM/FM/XM/CD player with USB connectivity. Options include Bluetooth; steering wheel audio controls; heated front seats; leather seating; a power driver's seat; automatic headlights; 17-inch wheels; and dual-zone automatic climate control. The Tucson can be ordered with Hyundai's first panoramic sunroof; telescoping steering, an engine cover, and premium audio are available, along with a touchscreen navigation system fitted in tandem with a rearview camera and Bluetooth stereo audio. Hyundai also continues to offer a 5-year/60,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty, which extends to 10 years/100,000 miles for some powertrain parts. Fully optioned, the 2010 Hyundai Tucson checks in at a believe-it-or-not $29,490, so take care with the order sheet.

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Used 2010 Hyundai Tucson for sale - Pricing & Features

more about this model

Pros

Classy interior, responsive handling, strong value, outside-the-box styling.

Cons

Tight rear seat and cargo space, rough ride, raspy engine, compromised visibility.

If you want a compact crossover that's economical, efficient and doesn't make you feel like you're taking the kids to T-ball, there are options, and one of the best is the new 2010 Hyundai Tucson. Let's start with styling, which should be different enough to stick out from the rows of CR-Vs parked at Target. While the old Tucson had all the design flair of a Coleman cooler, this new Tucson showcases Hyundai's increasing attention to design. Whether you believe the Tucson is attractive is one thing, but there's no denying its curves and creases are more interesting to behold than the boxes it competes with.

Inside, the story is much the same, with organic shapes and nicely textured materials. Competitors like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4 have a utilitarian look and feel to them -- not the Tucson. Unfortunately, those competitors are literally more utilitarian than the Tucson. The little Hyundai offers significantly less cargo capacity than its bigger rivals, while its backseat offers less space and doesn't recline or slide for more room or comfort. Essentially, the Tucson doesn't look like a mom mobile, and it wouldn't be a very good choice for her either.

As such, the 2010 Hyundai Tucson is best suited for singles or DINKs (dual income, no kids) who primarily want the elevated driving view that an SUV provides, and can live with an acceptable (rather than copious) amount of rear seat and cargo space. If you fancy yourself a cool mom, though, perhaps that trade-off could be worth it.

Performance

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson comes with a new four-cylinder engine that's more powerful than the outgoing Tucson's V6 and yet more fuel-efficient than the old four-cylinder. This new 2.4-liter inline-4 produces 176 horsepower and 168 pound-feet of torque, though in California-emissions states, those are lowered to 170 and 163, respectively. A six-speed manual and front-wheel drive are standard, but our Tucson GLS tester came with the six-speed automatic and four-wheel drive.

There's more low-end grunt on tap than in a Honda CR-V, but in general, the Tucson is merely average at best when it comes to power. It also has a raspy, wheezy engine note that doesn't do it any favors. While swift performance is hardly what we've come to expect from compact crossovers, fuel economy does figure quite prominently, and the Tucson 4WD delivers best-in-class thriftiness with EPA estimates of 21 mpg city/28 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined.

Athletic handling is also not something we expect from this class, but the 2010 Hyundai Tucson manages to feel buttoned-down and confident through turns. The steering is a bit numb, but it weights up firmly at speed to provide greater confidence than some of its competitors do. Would we say the Tucson is fun to drive? Probably not, but in comparison to a Chevy Equinox or RAV4, it'll at least provide a few more smiles.

Comfort

The downside to the Tucson's athletic handling is a firm ride that can get tiresome should you live in a city with a miniscule road repair budget. There's an excessive amount of impact harshness transmitted into the cabin, and that's with the 17-inch alloys fitted to our GLS trim level tester. The 18-inchers found on the Tucson Limited would likely make things worse. Road noise is also on the loud side in the 2010 Hyundai Tucson, though wind noise is reasonably well-contained. If you want a more serene highway tourer, a Chevy Equinox would be a better choice.

Rear passengers will find themselves sitting on a hard, shapeless cushion with a comparatively smallish amount of legroom. The seatback doesn't slide or recline -- features that are becoming more common and expected in this class. However, front-seat occupants are unlikely to complain. Even though our tester's driver seat was manually operated, it still provided enough adjustability for a variety of driver sizes. The seat itself is quite comfortable, in a firm, European sort of way, and provides just enough bolstering to make you feel secure, but not confined.

Function

Inside the 2010 Tucson's stylish cabin, Hyundai's penchant for utilizing straightforward controls continues. The manual climate controls couldn't be simpler, and all secondary buttons and switches (windows, mirrors, etc) are logically placed. Even the optional touchscreen navigation and audio controls are easy to figure out, while enhancing the usability of both the standard satellite radio and iPod interface with its large, clear display. That iPod interface is also notably speedy in its processing time and operation.

The Tucson's smaller dimensions penalize it when it comes to storage. Not only is there less space, but the cargo area doesn't offer the versatility of some of its competitors (removable shelves, sliding seats). There are also fewer storage areas in the cabin. Still, a set of golf clubs will fit the width of the trunk and a large suitcase fits easily behind it.

For parents, the Tucson surprisingly provides more space for a rear-facing child seat than the CR-V and RAV4. The top tether anchors were also quite easy to access for front-facing seats. However, without a sliding seat bottom, parents can't bring their kids closer to them as they can in the Tucson's bigger competitors.

Design/Fit and Finish

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson's interior is filled with hard plastic, but that's the norm for this class. Instead, textures, surfaces, design and appearance are more telling attributes and in this way, the Tucson seems like a high-quality product. The various buttons and knobs operate in a fluid manner, and they are nicely finished. The main climate control knobs in particular are finished with a material reminiscent of the knurled metal in a Bentley. The overall look is visually interesting, without compromising ergonomics or resorting to overwrought fake chrome.

Who should consider this vehicle

The 2010 Hyundai Tucson should appeal to those who want a small crossover that's more interesting to look at and drive than the run-of-the-mill Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. They should be willing to sacrifice some comfort and space for this, however. A sporty and spacious alternative would be the Subaru Forester, while a comfortable and spacious alternative would be the Chevy Equinox.

Others To ConsiderChevrolet Equinox, Honda CR-V, Nissan Rogue, Subaru Forester.

What's a good price on a used 2010 Hyundai Tucson ?

Price comparisons for used 2010 Hyundai Tucson trim styles:

The used 2010 Hyundai Tucson GLS PZEV is priced around $11998 with average odometer reading of 76000 miles.

The used 2010 Hyundai Tucson Limited is priced around $9505 with average odometer reading of 94119 miles.

Shop with Edmunds for perks and special offers on used cars, trucks, and SUVs near Phoenix, Arizona. Doing so could save you hundreds or thousands of dollars. Edmunds also provides consumer-driven dealership sales and service reviews to help you make informed decisions about what cars to buy and where to buy them.

What options are available on the 2010 Hyundai Tucson?

Available Hyundai Tucson 2010 Submodel Types: SUV

Available Hyundai Tucson 2010 Trims: SE, Value, SEL, SEL Plus, GLS, Sport, SE Plus, GL, Night, Eco, Limited PZEV, GLS PZEV, Limited, Walking Dead

Exterior Colors: Coliseum Grey, Dazzling White, Black Noir Pearl, Molten Silver, Ruby Wine, Caribbean Blue, Sedona Sunset, Ash Black, Winter White, Graphite Gray, Majove Sand, Garnet Red, Aurora Blue, Shadow Gray, Chromium Silver, Cotton White, Kona Bronze, Obsidian Black, Chai Bronze, Diamond Silver, Iris Blue, Nautical Blue, Platinum, Sahara Silver

Interior Colors: Gray cloth, Black leather, Beige cloth, Beige leather, Black leatherette/cloth, Beige leatherette/cloth, Taupe leatherette/cloth, Black leatherette, Black/Saddle leather, Gray leather, Black cloth, Black premium cloth, Taupe cloth, Taupe leather, Taupe leatherette

Popular Features: Back-up camera, Apple Carplay/Android Auto, Keyless Entry/Start, Blind Spot Monitoring, Power Liftgate/Trunk, Navigation, Post-collision safety system, Sunroof/Moonroof, Parking sensors, Upgraded Headlights, Lane Departure Warning, AWD/4WD, Towing Hitch, Remote Start, Alarm, Aux Audio Inputs, Fold Flat Rear Seats, Rear Bench Seats, Stability Control, Tire Pressure Warning, Trip Computer, USB Inputs, Audio and cruise controls on steering wheel, Auto Climate Control, Bluetooth, Heated seats, Leather Seats, Multi-Zone Climate Control, Power Driver Seat

Engine/Mechanics: 6, 4 cylinders

Transmission: AUTOMATED_MANUAL, AUTOMATIC, MANUAL

Fuel Types: regular unleaded

Drivetrains: all wheel drive, front wheel drive, four wheel drive

used 2010 Hyundai Tucson Overview

The used 2010 Hyundai Tucson is offered in the following submodels: SUV. Available styles include Limited 4dr SUV (2.4L 4cyl 6A), Limited PZEV 4dr SUV (2.4L 4cyl 6A), and Limited PZEV 4dr SUV 4WD (2.4L 4cyl 6A). Pre-owned Tucson models are available with a 0-liter gas engine, with output up to 0 hp, depending on engine type. The used 2010 Tucson comes with front wheel drive or four wheel drive. Available transmissions include: 6-speed shiftable automatic.

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Hyundai Tucson 2010

In 2010, a revolutionary new Tucson joins the rapidly evolving Hyundai product line. The sleek crossover from Hyundai, with its athletic European design, strikes a stark contrast from its predecessor and improves in every functional area, from its roomier cabin with extra cargo space to its leap in fuel economy and technology. Hyundai Tucson features the company’s “Fluidic Sculpture” design language and is the first vehicle in Hyundai’s 24/7 version 2.0 product initiative (seven all-new models by the end of 2011).

The all-new Tucson is the first Hyundai CUV (Crossover Utility Vehicle) to be designed and engineered in Europe at Hyundai’s Frankfurt-based design and technical centers. It features precedent-setting engineering including advanced weight saving technology and the eco-efficient Theta II 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine delivering up to 31 mpg on the highway. True to Hyundai form, the Tucson applies life-saving safety technologies as standard equipment while offering, for the first time, Downhill Brake Control (DBC) and Hillstart Assist Control (HAC). Likewise, to keep its passengers informed and comfortable Tucson integrates Hyundai’s first panoramic sunroof, touch-screen navigation and a Bluetooth® hands-free phone system.   

ALL-NEW TUCSON DELIVERS BETTER FUEL ECONOMY AND MORE POWER

In 2010, a revolutionary new Tucson joins the rapidly evolving Hyundai product line. The sleek crossover from Hyundai, with its athletic European design, strikes a stark contrast from its predecessor and improves in every functional area, from its roomier cabin with extra cargo space to its leap in fuel economy and technology. Tucson features the company’s “Fluidic Sculpture” design language and is the first vehicle in Hyundai’s 24/7 version 2.0 product initiative (seven all-new models by the end of 2011).

The all-new Tucson is the first Hyundai CUV (Crossover Utility Vehicle) to be designed and engineered in Europe at Hyundai’s Frankfurt-based design and technical centers. It features precedent-setting engineering including advanced weight saving technology and the eco-efficient Theta II 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine delivering up to 31 mpg on the highway. True to Hyundai form, the Tucson applies life-saving safety technologies as standard equipment while offering, for the first time, Downhill Brake Control (DBC) and Hillstart Assist Control (HAC). Likewise, to keep its passengers informed and comfortable Tucson integrates Hyundai’s first panoramic sunroof, touch-screen navigation and a Bluetooth® hands-free phone system.    

 

European Design       

Key attributes of Hyundai’s Fluidic Sculpture design philosophy are the athleticism and sophistication that Tucson demonstrates through its flowing lines, full surfaces and muscular presence. This athletic design language is highlighted by bold, dynamic graphic elements such as the new Hyundai family hexagonal front grille, aggressive lower air intake, sculptured hood creases, swept back headlights, sleek greenhouse and wraparound taillights. Chrome grille accents and door handles lend sophistication to the top-of-the-line Tucson Limited.

Conceived in a global collaboration among Hyundai’s U.S., Korean and European advanced product groups, with design execution led by the Frankfurt studio, the new Tucson was developed as an urban cruiser. It is tough and compact for life in the city, yet sleek and agile for out-of-town travel.

The Tucson combines dynamic, sculpted, performance-oriented styling with thoughtful everyday utility to create a vehicle that will change the way consumers, especially younger car buyers, think about compact crossovers.

With an overall length of 173.2 inches, a width of 71.7 inches and a height of 66.3 inches (with roof rails), Tucson has a great stance and road presence. The design team fused a light, elegant and sporty upper body with belt lines flowing off both the front and rear wheel arches, to a tough, planted lower body so that it is assertive in the way it sits on the road.

The profile of Tucson features a sports car-like theme with a double-zigzag treatment for the wheel arches that wrap around the available Euroflange 18-inch alloy wheels. The concave sills have a wedge-shaped profile that extends rearward and wraps around into the rear bumper, a first of its kind design in a vehicle of this type. The profile is further enhanced by modern silver roof rails.

 

With high-mounted taillights, multi-surfaced glass and a sculpted bumper, the rear of Tucson also incorporates dynamic design elements.

 

2010 Tucson 61 Pounds lighter than the outgoing model despite being three inches longer

  •  
    • The 2010 Tucson is 3.3 inches longer and one inch wider than its predecessor, yet 61 pounds lighter  
    • 2010 Tucson has a longer wheelbase and overall width than CR-V, Escape and Forester to deliver more packing efficiency 
    • Body stiffness is 38 percent greater than Rogue 

World-class weight efficiency was one of the program targets for the Tucson engineering team. In fact, the 2010 Tucson leads all of its competitors in weight efficiency. Hyundai engineers also targeted leadership in power-to-weight ratio. Having these targets paid huge dividends in both performance and fuel economy.  

Vehicle

Curb Weight (lbs.)

Horsepower

Power-to-weight ratio

Hyundai Tucson

3,203

176

18.20

Honda CR-V

3,386

180

18.82

Toyota RAV4

3,360

179

18.77

Subaru Forester

3,250

170

19.12

Nissan Rogue

3,267

170

19.22

Ford Escape

3,390

171

19.83

The Tucson’s widespread use of high-strength steel provides increased strength at a lower body weight. High-strength steel allows the four-wheel independent suspension to work optimally. At 3,203 pounds for an automatic transmission model, the Tucson is lighter than its competitors, while offering more interior room than Rogue and Escape, with body-bending rigidity 38 percent higher than the Rogue. The Tucson owes its 31 mpg estimated EPA highway rating to its weight efficient unibody architecture.

FUN-TO-DRIVE   

The 2010 Tucson’s athletic shape is now complemented with more agile handling, responsive steering and improved body roll control. These enhancements make the new Tucson more fun-to-drive. Tucson uses MacPherson strut front and multi-link rear suspension systems for more precise wheel control and a smoother ride. All four wheels are controlled by coil springs and fade-resistant gas-charged dampers. Stabilizer bar diameters have also increased. The front suspension now has a new 25 mm hollow stabilizer bar to save weight versus the predecessors 21 mm solid stabilizer bar. The rear suspension has a new 18 mm solid stabilizer bar versus the predecessors 14 mm stabilizer bar. Larger stabilizer bars keep the vehicle very flat during cornering and help provide quick turn-in response. 

Rack-and-pinion Motor-Driven Power Steering (MDPS) also contributes to the Tucson’s nimble and refined handling dynamics while saving fuel and reducing interior noise. The MDPS system uses the vehicle’s electrical system for power (unlike the older hydraulic system), allowing for increased fuel economy and calibrated steering efforts through all vehicle speed ranges. 

Due to the suspension geometry and wider track width that enables greater turn angles, Tucson’s turning circle is 34.7 feet – an advantage Tucson drivers will appreciate in their daily driving and parking. In fact, Tucson’s turning diameter bests Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4.

Vehicle

Turning diameter

2010 Hyundai Tucson

34.7

2009 Toyota RAV4

34.8

2009 Hyundai Tucson

35.4

2009 Jeep Patriot

36.6

2009 Ford Escape

36.7

2009 Nissan Rogue

37.4

2009 Honda CR-V

37.8

 

TUCSON DELIVERS BETTER FUEL ECONOMY THAN CR-V

            The Tucson was engineered to be more fuel efficient than its predecessor and chief competitors like the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. The 2010 Tucson accomplishes this while being 3.3 inches longer and one inch wider than its predecessor and having a longer wheelbase than Honda CR-V, Ford Escape and Subaru Forester

Tucson features the Theta II 2.4-liter DOHC inline four-cylinder engine. The Theta II engine delivers about the same amount of power and acceleration as its predecessor’s V6 engine with 20 percent better fuel economy than the old four-cylinder engine. In fact, the Tucson is more fuel-efficient than Honda CRV, Nissan Rogue, Toyota RAV4 and Ford Escape four-cylinder engines boasting an impressive estimated 23 mpg city/31 mpg highway fuel economy rating with the available six-speed automatic transmission with SHIFTRONIC® and front wheel drive. Tucson features low rolling resistance silica tires to contribute to the 31 mpg highway. With AWD (All-Wheel Drive), Tucson delivers an estimated 21 mpg city/28 mpg highway exceeding the primary competitors AWD versions including Subaru Forester.

The Theta II is rated at 176 horsepower (26 percent more than its predecessor) and 168 lb.-ft. of torque. This high-tech, all-aluminum, 16-valve engine features Continuously Variable Valve Timing (CVVT) on both camshafts and a Variable Induction System (VIS) for better engine breathing. In the green states, the 2010 Tucson is certified as a Partial Zero Emission Vehicle (PZEV) which means it is as clean as a hybrid.

Powertrain Comparison

2010Tucson 

2010CR-V

2010Rogue

2010RAV4

2010Escape

2010Forester

Displacement

2.4L

2.4L

2.5L

2.5L

2.5L

2.5L

Horsepower

176@6000

180@6800

170@6000

179@6000

171@6000

170@6000

Torque (lb.-ft.)

168@4000

161@4400

175@4400

172@4000

171@4500

170@4400

A/T

6-speed

5-speed

CVT

4-speed

6-speed

4-speed

EPA Fuel economy FWD A/T

23/31

21/28

22/27

22/28

21/28

20/26(4WD)

Emissions

PZEV/ULEV

ULEV

PZEV/LEV

ULEV

LEV

PZEV/LEV

For the 2011 model year, Hyundai will introduce a high-mileage Blue model.  The Blue model will be powered by a Theta II 2.0-liter engine that delivers better power and fuel economy than the 2009 Tucson Beta four-cylinder engine. The 2.0-liter Theta-II has shed over 22 pounds from its previous iteration. For better fuel efficiency and reduced emissions, the 2.0-liter Theta-II also gets Dual CVVT (intake and exhaust camshaft phaser) while Theta-I was equipped with only CVVT on the intake camshaft. Major improvements also begin with the application of a two-stage Variable Intake System (VIS) which enables switching between long and short intake manifold resulting in an across-the-board performance increase. To reduce internal friction, engineers have applied a Diamond-Like-Coating (DLC) to the top surface of the valve tappets resulting in improved fuel efficiency. Engineers also expended considerable time and effort optimizing the oil pressure to achieve an ideal balance between durability and fuel economy. 

Tucson will join the Blue lineup of vehicles that includes Accent and Elantra. Tucson Blue will deliver outstanding fuel economy without adding hundreds of dollars to the price. In fact, the “Blue” model will be priced lower than other Tucson models, assuring it will be both efficient and economical. Hyundai is focused on achieving an excellent mpg-per-dollar ratio with the Tucson Blue model. Fuel-efficient modifications will likely include low-rolling-resistance tires, enhanced aerodynamics, revised engine calibrations and reduced final drive ratios to deliver even higher mileage and lower emissions. The new Tucson high mileage edition will be identified with unique “Blue” badging.

 

FUEL ECONOMY INNOVATIONS

To help Tucson drivers get the most out of their vehicles, Hyundai added a standard trip computer and economy indicator. The trip computer provides distance to empty, average fuel consumption, average vehicle speed, elapsed time and instant fuel economy. The “Eco Indicator” on automatic transmission models nestled between the speedometer and tachometer displays a green LED light in accordance with fuel-efficient driving behavior. Fuel savings in the range of 15 to 17 percent are attainable with the automatic Eco Indicator. Manual transmission models have a shift indicator to inform drivers of the optimal time to upshift and downshift. Fuel savings in the range 7 to 9 percent are attainable with the manual Eco Gear Shift Indicator.

Further gains in fuel efficiency have been realized by the Motor-Driven Power Steering system which delivers excellent responsiveness and accurate handling.

 

SIX-SPEED AUTOMATIC AND MANUAL TRANSMISSIONS

Hyundai’s commitment to making the Tucson extremely fuel efficient continues with a six-speed automatic transmission with SHIFTRONIC® manual control or a standard six-speed manual transaxle.

Hyundai's all-new six-speed automatic transaxle helps the company meet its goals of improving fuel efficiency and reducing emissions. Shifts are silky-smooth with an option of manual control through the SHIFTRONIC feature. Designed for transverse engine applications in passenger cars and SUVs, the new compact transmission puts Hyundai into an elite class of auto manufacturers who have designed their own proprietary six-speed automatic transmissions. The strength of the design is its unique layout which makes it smaller, more compact and lighter than any other six-speed on the market today.

For the customer, the new six-speed delivers a performance edge. In this application (FWD/A/T), it helps bring a 24 percent gain in highway fuel economy (31 mpg versus 25 mpg in the ‘09).

There is no dipstick in the gearbox because it is filled with automatic transmission fluid that is good for the life of the vehicle under normal usage conditions, thereby reducing maintenance costs.

Developed over a four-year period, this new six-speed automatic is 26.4 pounds lighter than Hyundai’s five-speed. It also is 1.6 inches shorter and considerably simpler having 62 fewer parts, which is a key to increased durability, lighter weight and lower cost.

When it comes to transmissions, more gears are definitely better.  The addition of a sixth gear enables closer spacing between gear ratios providing a better balance of performance and fuel economy while the wide overall gear ratio helps deliver strong acceleration.

The gearbox has three planetary gearsets and a unique flat torque converter which shortens the unit's overall length by 0.47 inches. Four pinion differentials improve durability and further minimize size.

Another example of engineering ingenuity is found in the design of the hydraulic pressure control unit. Because there are always slight manufacturing deviations from one solenoid valve to the next which cause fluctuation in the hydraulic pressure and affect shift precision and quality, the transaxle features cleverly integrated adjustment screws in the valves which enable each of the eight valves to be calibrated at the factory. This feature ensures stable hydraulic pressure at any shift point which facilitates a high degree of precision and control needed to deliver fast, smooth and precise shifts throughout the rpm range.

CAPABLE FOR OUT-OF-TOWN TRAVEL

To make the Tucson even more versatile, Hyundai engineers added an advanced electronic AWD system designed by JTEKT. The AWD system will automatically activate under any driving condition when needed, distributing the power equally and optimizing driving performance. Under normal driving, the system only distributes power to the front wheels thereby reducing fuel consumption. The system includes a driver-selectable AWD lock allowing for a 50/50 torque split between the front and rear wheels for off-road and very slippery conditions. 

For even more driver control, the 2010 Tucson features Hyundai’s first Hillstart Assist Control (HAC) and Downhill Brake Control (DBC). HAC is designed to minimize rolling backwards on steep ascents. By selecting the DBC switch, the Hydro-Electronic Control unit manages the wheel speed sensors, steering angle sensor and acceleration sensor to maintain control and speed on steep declines without having to use the brake. Neither of these controls are available on CR-V, Escape or Rogue and are typically found on luxury SUVs with much higher price tags.

Thoughtful Interior Design

Inside, the five-seat Tucson offers a commanding view of the road and evokes an adventurous ambience that is also laid-back and relaxing. The needs of the driver are fully accommodated, with the interior blending aspects of the outdoors and an urban lifestyle. For example, Hyundai’s first panoramic sunroof brings the outside “inside” for all passengers.

An X-shaped visual theme is repeated across numerous areas of the cabin while metal paint accents provide flashes of visual brilliance.

Shapely seats feature center panels trimmed in breathable fabric with attractive and functional cushion side bolsters, plus additional lateral support for occupants’ shoulders. On the insert of the cloth seats, there is a hexagonal pattern stitched into the fabric matching the new front grille design.

The long wheelbase and generous width of the Tucson, combined with Hyundai’s expertise in interior packaging, have produced an interior that delivers class-leading rear legroom and improved headroom. These improvements were accomplished while lowering the overall height of the vehicle. The Tucson now has more passenger volume than Rogue and Escape at 101.9 cubic feet. Tucson’s cargo capacity is 13 percent greater than its predecessor. In fact, Tucson has more interior volume than Acura RDX, and more cargo volume than Infiniti FX. The spacious cabin on Tucson Limited is further enhanced for all passengers by Hyundai’s first available panoramic sunroof with UV blocking. The front panel of the sunroof can either tilt open or open completely by sliding up and over the rear panel. An anti-pinch system guards against injuries. Finally, with the extra wheelbase length, Hyundai engineers were able to expand front seat tracks allowing taller drivers a comfortable seating position.

The high-tech cockpit comes standard with Hyundai’s signature blue lighting, power windows, power door locks, fold-away mirrors and remote keyless entry with alarm and panic button. Bluetooth hands-free phone system with voice recognition and steering wheel audio and cruise controls are also available. Another premium feature in the Tucson Limited is a CleanAir Ionizer that automatically cleans the air when the heater or air conditioner is running.

Other available features include leather seating surfaces, heated front seats, power driver seat with lumbar support, automatic headlights, side repeater exterior mirrors, front wiper de-icer and dual front automatic temperature control. 

Audiophiles will love Tucson’s 160-watt AM/FM/XM/CD/MP3 audio system with six speakers. This system includes XM Satellite Radio® and iPod®/USB auxiliary inputs as standard equipment. When an iPod or flash drive is connected through the USB port, which is located in the storage tray, not only does it play music through the vehicle’s six-speaker audio system, but it also charges the iPod and allows the driver to access tracks with the steering wheel audio controls. This system also allows both driver and passengers to easily view song/artist/title information and control the music from the audio head unit rather than only the iPod itself.

The 2010 Tucson can be further upgraded with an optional navigation system with rearview camera. Shifting into reverse automatically turns on the rear-view camera that provides a wide-angle view reducing the risk of accidents. This navigation system also provides Bluetooth streaming audio capability. This easy-to-use unit can be controlled via a 6.5-inch LCD touch-screen or voice-activation by headliner-mounted microphone. The voice recognition allows the user to control the navigation system, audio system and phone commands. The system comes matched with the 360-watt premium audio system that includes an external amplifier and subwoofer. It plays compact discs, accesses digital music files employing Bluetooth streaming audio or allows driver and passenger to access their personal listening devices through the iPod/USB/auxiliary inputs. Bluetooth audio wirelessly streams music from a phone to the audio system. And with a Bluetooth-enabled phone, a local restaurant can be called for reservations before plotting the route. The XM Satellite Radio interface is also integrated into the navigation unit and features channel logos and real-time NavTraffic with detour function. XM Satellite Radio and NavTraffic service are complimentary for the first 90 days. 

STORAGE GALORE

The 2010 Tucson features a total of 19 different storage places and drink holders:

  • Console storage tray
  • Glove box
  • Overhead sunglass storage
  • Armrest storage compartment
  • Two front seat drink holders
  • Two rear center armrest drink holders
  • Four bottle holders – one in each door
  • Four map pockets – one in each door
  • Two seatback pockets
  • Cargo area storage tray

Not only does the Tucson feature all these storage options, but Hyundai engineers have improved them over the previous model. The center console has been enlarged to 370 cubic inches (an increase of 205 cubic inches). The height of the rear cargo screen has been raised by almost three inches for more storage, plus a tray has been added to keep things organized. The cargo area also features a dual-sided cargo floor with tough plastic on one side for messy items and carpet on the other. The bottle holders even have grips to make sure the bottle doesn’t tip over.    

Advanced Standard Safety Technologies:  PART OF HYUNDAi’S ASSURANCE COMMITMENT

            The 2005 Tucson was the first Hyundai model to feature standard ESC (Electronic Stability Control) upon its launch in fall 2004. It was also the first vehicle under $20,000 with standard ESC and six airbags. The Tucson started Hyundai’s approach to combining state-of-the-art safety and affordability and this approach lives on in the 2010 Tucson. The Tucson is loaded with life-saving standard safety features including ESC with traction control, six airbags and active front head restraints. Its braking system features four-wheel disc brakes controlled by an advanced four-channel ABS with Brake Assist, providing maximum braking force when a panic stop is detected, and Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) to optimize brake performance with uneven weight distribution.

            ESC compares the driver’s intended course with the vehicle’s actual response. If needed, ESC then brakes individual front or rear wheels and/or reduces engine power to help correct understeer or oversteer. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) studies show SUVs equipped with ESC experience 67 percent fewer single-vehicle crashes, and 63 percent fewer single-vehicle fatalities. In addition, a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) found that ESC reduces the risk of all fatal collisions by 52 percent and the risk of fatal single-vehicle rollovers of SUVs by 80 percent.

The Tucson is engineered to provide its passengers with multiple defensive safety layers. The steel unibody has integrated crumple zones and a high-tensile front sub-frame designed to work together to reduce the forces that typically reach the passenger compartment. Particular attention has been paid to increasing the stiffness of the front side members which have been enlarged and straightened. Also, the center pillars serve as the anchors of a new ring structure which improves overall side structure stiffness while also creating more room for the door armrest and seat. All four doors also have internal guard beams to protect passengers in a side-impact collision.

            The entire body shell has been made stiffer and lighter thanks to its extensive use of ultra-high tensile strength steel, which comprises 68.9 percent of the shell compared to its predecessor's 57.3 percent. Also, the use of Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) has been expanded on key structural members. TWB assemblies combine steels of different thickness and grades using a sophisticated laser welding and stamping process to achieve an optimal stiffness-to-weight ratio. TWBs reduce body weight while enhancing crash energy management. These safety systems are expected to earn the 2010 Tucson NHTSA’s top five-star crash test rating for front and side impacts.

Tucson’s standard front-seat active head restraints help prevent whiplash by automatically reducing the space between a front occupant’s head and the head restraint during certain rear collisions and are highly recommended by safety organizations such as the IIHS.

The Tucson’s passenger restraint systems also help minimize injury. Three-point belts are provided at all five seating positions, and the front seatbelts have pretensioners and load limiters. There are two outboard rear Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children (LATCH) child-seat anchors.

Elongated flush-mounted headlamps not only add a strong sense of style but also feature projector beam lenses for improved night-time driving safety. Side mirror housings have been modified to reduce wind noise and also feature an integrated repeater lamp for improved visibility on the Limited trim.

            A total of six airbags are positioned in the Tucson’s interior. Dual advanced frontal airbags are complemented by front seat-mounted side-impact airbags and roof-mounted side-curtain airbags with new rollover sensors that cover both the front and rear seat rows. The combination of side and curtain airbags, which help protect the head and body during side impacts, can reduce fatalities by more than 45 percent, according to the IIHS. 

Tucson also features a standard Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) which alerts drivers if one or more tires are under inflated.

 

WARRANTY

            The 2010 Hyundai Tucson is protected by the Hyundai Advantage, America's Best Warranty. Coverage includes five-year/60,000-mile bumper-to-bumper protection,

10-year/100,000-mile limited powertrain warranty, and seven-year/unlimited mileage anti-perforation coverage. In addition, Tucson buyers receive 24-hour roadside assistance coverage at no extra charge for five years (no mileage limit) and that service includes emergency towing, lockout service and limited coverage for trip-interruption expenses. There is no deductible on any of these coverages.

QUIET CABIN

Extensive work was done to isolate sounds and eliminate vibrations. The all-new 2010 Tucson is discernibly quieter both at highway speeds and at idle than its predecessor. Booming noise is reduced thanks to a sub-frame dynamic damper while the rear luggage area gets extra soundproofing to isolate exhaust sounds. Road noise has been minimized by improving stiffness in the front and rear struts, rear trailing arm and the spring sheet.

Engineering & Manufacturing

            The Tucson is built in the Ulsan plant in South Korea. Known by the project name LM, the Tucson took 36 months and $225 million to develop. Tucson has been one of the most popular Hyundai models with more than one million units sold worldwide since its launch in 2004.

COLORS

The 2010 Tucson is offered in nine colors with an optimum mix between lighter and darker colors to satisfy regional preferences. The colors are Cotton White, Diamond Silver, Graphite Gray, Ash Black, Garnet Red, Iris Blue, Aurora Blue, Chai Bronze and Kiwi Green.  Three interior colors Black, Taupe and Saddle will be available.

 

AVAILABILITY

            Mass production of the Tucson started at the Ulsan factory for the United States market in October 2009 with sales starting in December 2009.

 

SMALL CUV Landscape

            Thanks to their all-around functionality and value, small crossover utility vehicle (CUV) sales are projected to grow at a rate far above the industry average through 2014. These CUVs are among the fastest growing segments on the market today due to their convenient size, car-like refinement and good fuel economy relative to larger SUVs. Fueling this growth are seven all-new model introductions through 2014. The Tucson with a host of unique and attractive features positions Hyundai front and center in this booming segment.  

 HYUNDAI MOTOR AMERICA

Hyundai Motor America, headquartered in Fountain Valley, Calif., is a subsidiary of Hyundai Motor Co. of Korea. Hyundai vehicles are distributed throughout the United States by Hyundai Motor America and are sold and serviced through more than 790 dealerships nationwide.

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